Book Review: “Mapping the Deep” by Robert Kunzig

“Mapping the Deep” is a book which draws you in to the realm of the deep sea – far from shore. Imagine looking out of the window into a sky filled with the sea, we are taken into the world of the abyss. The author describes the book as a portrait of our understanding of the sea- with its distinct focus on the distant and the unfamiliar making it such a pleasure to discover. Laurence Madin of WHOI describes this popular science book as “The best account of discovery in oceanography I’ve ever read” and the chapters which follow are just as inspiring to read.

mappingthedeep Space and the Ocean narrates the meeting of oxygen to hydrogen and the story of Albert Cheung, the graduate student who first observed water in space. The birth of the solar system and the possible role comets played in bringing water and organic matter onto the Earth are discussed to explain the origins the earth and its ocean basins. Then we start of on a wonderful narrative about the history of early bathymetric mapping and charting in Sounding the depths – from Charles Bonneycastle to the Challenger Expeditions to Atlantis. Introducing marine geologists Marie Tharp and Bruce Heezen’s discovery of the V-shaped notch at the top of The Rift in the Atlantic and Hess’s concept of seafloor spreading; the chapter leads to a paradigm shift in earth science to the theory of plate tectonics. Their first bathymetric map of the ocean and its geological features are described in A Map of the World. Turbidity currents and their extraordinary impact on the abyss and the early remote sensing satellites prior to the advent of sonar lead to  Sandwell and Smith’s famous map of the oceans.The Seafloor at Birth goes on to discuss the history of multibeam sonar and the mapping of the US Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and the quest to understand the birth of the seafloor. Continue reading “Book Review: “Mapping the Deep” by Robert Kunzig”