Cometh seaweeds, cometh structure in marine habitats

Pleased to invite you to a seminar by Dr Kathryn Schoenrock, who is the EPA-Ireland, Primary Investigator and Postdoctoral Researcher at National University of Ireland (NUI) Galway, on Tuesday 27th July at 1300 BST. The webinar is entitled “Cometh seaweeds, cometh structure in marine habitats.”

She obtained her PhD (Biology) in 2014 from the University of Alabama at Birmingham where she investigated the ecology and physiology of Antarctic Seaweeds, with an emphasis in chemical ecology and climate change effects. She has since worked extensively in south-western Greenland trying to understand the diversity of kelp forest and coralline algae habitats, but her experience with climate change and the marine region drew her to the Lusitanian region of the North Atlantic where marine communities mirror projections for the Boreal region under present climate change regimes. She currently works on creating a baseline for marine monitoring in kelp forest communities found in western Ireland, and works closely with citizen science outlets, science festivals, and commercial organisations. She is originally from California, and has studied marine ecosystems (especially those structured by seaweeds) from Antarctica to Greenland for over 15 years.

Register below for link and updates:

International Women’s Day- Women in Ocean Sciences

One highlight of Dr Siddhi Joshi’s life was holding a Manx shearwater chick at Skomer Island, Wales, after climbing steep cliffs to clear marine debris before seal pupping season! Initially inspired by her scientific roots in marine ecology, Siddhi did her undergraduate in Marine Biology with Oceanography and then studied hydrography. Following her MSc, she came to Galway to study maerl coralline algae during her PhD in Earth and Ocean Science and Post-Doc in Geography. She presented at conferences, went on fieldtrips sampling maerl and is committee member of Women in Coastal Geoscience and Engineering. #InternationalWomensDay2020

Follow Siddhi on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram @seabedhabitats

Some more photos from the field:

Maerl Beach Morphodynamics Fieldwork in Carraroe

A high resolution beach morphodynamics experiment and monitoring of the intra-wave sediment transport took place last week at Carraroe’s maerl beach in County Galway. A large frame with seven distance sensors mounted facing downwards, was used. These data, together with GPS and offshore wave measurements using the AWAC instrument, as well as drone imagery, are being used to construct high resolution Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) and as part of a beach morphodynamics process model (using XBeach). Here are some photos of the experiment, which forms part of the Geological Survey Ireland Short Call 2017 project.

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Frame still standing in the high spring tide

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Sunset at Carraroe Trá an Doilín Beach

Acknowledgements

This field work is funded by and forms part of the Geological Survey Ireland Short call 2017 project no. 43 (PI: Siddhi Joshi).

Art Inspiring Action to Protect our Oceans

Using art is an essential tool in halting the destruction of threatened species. People only protect what they love—and recognizing this, we can bring the beauty and vulnerability of marine life to mainstream audiences across the globe, fueling a new wave of curiosity and appreciation for the oceans, and inspire the global community to take immediate steps to conserve them.